One Beer Article You Need To Read And Why, 4/20/17

Wooderson is kind of cool.  Yeah, it is creepy he still hangs out with high school girls when he is somewhere in his 20s, but he is still kind of cool mostly because he is played by Matthew McConaughey.  He hasn’t learned Chris Rock’s advice about being the old guy at the club.

I don’t think Sam Koch or Boston Beer company has learned that.  However, circumstances are proving that Chris Rock was correct for some brewers as well as Wooderson or guys like this.

Bryan Roth has written a great blog post about Boston Beer and why it may no longer be considered craft by the Brewers Association long after it is no longer considered craft by most craft beer drinkers.  I posit that the average 26-year-old sitting in a tap room he walked to from his apartment this afternoon thinks of Sam Adams the same as he thinks of Bud or Miller.  It seems at least recently Sam Koch didn’t understand this.  Also, until recently the Brewers Association agreed, literally changing its own rules to keep Boston Beer as a dues paying member.

That time is probably over and it should be according to Roth’s research.  Currently, estimates project that only 57.2% of Boston Beer’s barrel production comes from actual beer.  Why is that you ask?  They produce Angry Orchard and a bevy of hard sodas, teas, and other liquids with just enough alcohol to make the drinker think they are living on the edge.

I think it is harder for larger (and particularly legacy brewers) to change course as fast as the current craft beer scene requires.  I believe brewers like Boston Beer, Stone, Lagunitas, Stone and even Sierra Nevada are in danger.  That danger is not from ABI or MillerCoors.  It is from all the small locally focused brewers who were inspired by Boston Beer, Sierra Nevada and their like.

My advice to those breweries is not really an answer, but it is to be nimbler.  Figure out how to change course and quickly and adjust what you are offering to the craft beer public without changing the core of who and what you are.  The one way to do that is to bring in new, younger leadership.

That doesn’t mean to go out and find some hired gun CEO type to run the business.  It means elevating someone who has been with the brewery for a while and is steeped in what the brewery stands for to a position of true leadership and influence.  That is often the child of the founder like in the cases of Sierra Nevada and Bells Brewery.  In the last few years, both companies’ founders have begun the process of turning over decision-making to their children.  Time will tell if the younger leaders can manage this changing craft beer dynamic.

Valar Morgulis.  No one likes to see companies fail and die.  However, no company (or country) is guaranteed infinite existence.  Just as all men die, so do all companies eventually.  We, the craft beer drinkers of this country must accept this, especially of the next few years because some of the brewers that will go away will shock and surprise us.